Learn to Draw - basic drawing materials




Drawing Materials

You have your pencils, but you're going to need a few more materials. The nice thing about drawing is that it's a pretty inexpensive hobby. Drawing is simple enough that you could use any writing implement and any drawing surface, but if you're going to take the time to learn, you might as well get some decent tools.

Lap desk.

Since this site is on the InterWebs, you'll probably be sitting in front of your computer as you draw, so you're going to have to be comfortable there. If you're at a large desk where you can just clear a spot next to your keyboard, that would be fine. If you're at a smaller desk, or just don't have room to draw on your computer desk, might I suggest a "lap desk". At many art supply stores, and even at some Wal-Marts, Targets or Hobby Lobbys you can buy what looks like a large clipboard. It's just a large piece of wood with clips bolted on so you can clip your paper to the board. Of course, you could just get your own board and tape your paper to it as well. What you will do is set the board in your lap as you sit at your computer desk and lean the top of the board on your desk so you have an angled surface to work on. You may want to angle yourself so you can get to your computer's mouse and work the popping images and navigation of this site.

For paper you can just use typing paper of at least 8.5x11 inches or just grab a stack of printer paper.

Get one of those pink school erasers. Hopefully you'll never use it. You may also want to get a bunch of those cone shaped erasers that fit on the end of a pencil.

If you have a ruler, have it handy as well. We won't be using it too much, but in these beginning exercises, it will be nice to have on hand.

Something you probably didn't expect you'd need is an empty picture frame. While you're at Wal-Mart or Target get a cheap $3.00 5x7 inch picture frame. One with plastic and not glass would be best. Also, pick up one black permanent marker and also a few non-permanent (or "washable") black markers. After you get the frame home, take the glass or plastic out of the frame, and with the permanent marker and a ruler, segment the glass into four equal planes like this. Now put the glass back in the frame and bend the staples or tabs back to keep the glass in place. Don't put the backing back on the frame, all we need is the frame and the glass. What this frame is is your "drawing plane". It's going to help you compose the subjects in your drawings, and it's also going to help you see two dimensionally. We'll get deeper into it's use later.

That's it! Now let's continue with the learning!

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